UVR Defense Tech, Ltd.
"Each military nation adapts the look of camouflage materials (colours and patterns) to their application needs and environmental conditions in which the fabric will be used (forest, desert, ...) in order to achieve adequate camouflage properties. Camouflage properties must also cover a wide range of the electromagnetic spectrum, including ultraviolet (< 400 nm) and the visible spectrum (400 - 800 nm)."[1]
What is Wrong with Our Military Camouflage?
"A notable feature of warfare is that advances in technology proceed in discrete stages. As soon as one threat is countered by technology, another more complex threat emerges. Camouflage research is a good example of this, as new threats in different parts of the spectrum are developed and then subsequently defeated."[2]

Top image is Multicam in visible light; bottom image is Multicam in ultraviolet light.

The latest camouflage pattern of the U.S. Army is the Crye Multicam®. This is the pattern worn in the photos on the right. In the top image, taken in visible light, the uniform blends well with the foliage and shadows. The lower image is in ultraviolet light - the same uniform offers an enemy a clear target.


For a series of photos taken in visible light, near-Infrared, and ultraviolet light, click here.

The camera used to capture the images to the right was straight off the shelf, with a UV bandpass filter over the lens. Not an expensive piece of equipment and readily available worldwide to any quasi-military or terrorist group. It is the availability of such inexpensive, real-time, UV imaging sensors that has made near-ultraviolet camouflage a field necessity for both personnel and strategic military equipment.

Today a belligerent can purchase a used camcorder for one hundred and ten dollars over the Internet. Add a few optical filters and the enemy has a scope that provides clear, real-time imaging in the near-ultraviolet, visible light, and the near-IR.


For videos of military camouflage in ultraviolet light, click here.

The time has come to defeat the threat of ultraviolet sensors on the battlefield. UVRC makes this possible.


[1] Analysis of Printed Fabrics for Military Camouflage Clothing
S. Kovacevic, et al,
FIBRES & TEXTILES in Eastern Europe 2012, Vol. 20, No. 3 (92)

[2]from "Handbook of Technical Textiles" By A. Richard Horrocks, Subhash Anand, S. Anand (2000)


UVRC is the only camouflage system designed for the near-ultraviolet spectrum.


"UVRC", "UVRC-P", and "UVRC-A" are trademarks of UVR Defense Tech, Ltd.
"MultiCam" is a registered trademark of Crye Precision LLC.
Copyright 2010-2012 UVR Defense Tech, Ltd.